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SCOOP

SCOOP is a research and training centre dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of sustainable cooperation as a key feature of resilient societies. The centre connects research groups from sociology, psychology, history, philosophy, public administration, research methods, and statistics. SCOOP is a joint initiative by the University of Groningen (Strategic Theme  Sustainable Society) and Utrecht University (Strategic Theme Institutions for Open Societies), and also involves researchers from the VU Amsterdam, the Erasmus University Rotterdam, and Radboud University Nijmegen. The 2025 Vision for Science of the Dutch Ministry of Education (2014, p. 19) praised SCOOP as an “example of cross-pollination between disciplines”.

 

More about the program

Training

In addition to the academic ambitions, the program wants to realise several tangible long-term gains. In order to achieve them we created the Training Center. It is organized in two sections, each of them with  a specific target. The first one is research-oriented and it is aimed at prospective students. The second is policy-oriented and its target are practitioners.

For prospective students 

The first section of our Training Center consists in a talent selection and training program to prepare the next generation of top researchers. In the spirit of the research center, students will be trained in a transdisciplinary fashion to include elements from psychology, sociology, philosophy, and history.For more information on the teaching program, click here.

For practitioners

The second section of our Training Center makes use of the main results from the research center as a whole. The goal is to provide insights and instruments that can be used to train societal partners and stakeholders to foster a resilient society.

On Monday, March 27, 2017, 8 p.m., prof. dr. Bas Van Bavel will speak in the University of Groningen Studium Generale Series The End of an Economic Era? 

 Location: Academy Building, Broerstraat 5, Groningen, Tickets: Availlable from Wednesday 1 March

The general notion is that market economies are modern and promote economic growth and welfare. Economic historian Bas van Bavel uses historical research to show that market economies are not modern, but have existed at various times in the past. They rise, stagnate, and decline. They initially generate economic growth, but their dynamism leads to the rise of new market elites who accumulate land and capital. In the long term, this creates social polarization and a decline of average welfare. Also, these new elites gradually translate their economic wealth into political leverage. Thus makes markets increasingly more unequal and less efficient, it contributes to economic stagnation and finally makes these markets stagnate or decline again. The end-situation is one of economic stagnation, material inequality and unfreedom, similar to the situation at the start of this cycle. This analysis enables us to better assess the situation in current market economies, the United States and Northwestern Europe. High levels of wealth inequality, increasing polarization, stagnating welfare and growing political leverage of the market elites indicate that we are over the tipping point towards the negative phases of the cycle. Is there a way out?

With a critical response by Nuno Palma, economic historian at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Groningen

Resources

LIBRARY

 

Books           Articles

 

DATA

Experimental            Panel            Historical            Cross-national

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